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The Standing on the Shoulders of Giants "Teach & Learn" Black History Curriculum​​

Specially designed for Parents, Teachers, Homeschool, or Independent Study, grades 5+

Where Black
History Lives!​

Unit 1: Ancient Africa - The Cradle of Civilization
(200,000 B.C. - 476 B.C.)

Unit 1: Class 13: The Queen of Sheba & Solomon (10th Century B.C. – 955 B.C.)

People To Know
16th century depiction of a dark skinned King Solomon from Vologda, Russia. The Bible does not ascribe a "race" to Solomon or any other individuals for that matter. "Race" was not an issue in the world prior to the 15th century A.D. Before then, Africa and Black Africans were respected in world history.
Image of Solomon meeting with his son, Menelik I, whom he had with the Queen of Sheba. It is believed that Solomon gave Menelik the Covenant of the Ark, which he carried back to Ethiopia after declining to stay in Jerusalem.

Queen of Sheba Wikipedia Excerpts cont.

Christian Account

Christian scriptures mention a "queen of the South," who "came from the uttermost parts of the earth", i.e. from the extremities of the then known (Christian) world, to hear the wisdom of Solomon (Mt. 12:42; Lk. 11:31).

The mystical interpretation of the Canticles, which was felt of supplying a literal basis for the speculations of the allegorists, makes its first appearance in Origen, who wrote a voluminous commentary on the Canticles. In his commentary, Origen identified the bride of the Canticles with the "queen of the South" of the Gospels, i. e. the Queen of Sheba, who is assumed to have been Ethiopian. Others have proposed either the marriage of Solomon with Pharaoh's daughter, or his marriage with an Israelitish woman, the Shulamite. The former was the favorite opinion of the mystical interpreters to the end of the 18th century; the latter has obtained since its introduction by Good (1803)

The bride of the Canticles is assumed to have been black due to a passage in Cant. 1:5, which the Revised Standard Version (1952) translates as "I am verydark, but comely", as does Jerome (Latin: Nigra sum, sed formosa), while the New Revised Standard Version (1989) has "I am black and beautiful", as the Septuagint.​

Jewish Account

According to Josephus (Ant. 8:165–73), the queen of Sheba was the queen of Egypt and Ethiopia, and brought to Israel the first specimens of the balsam, which grew in the Holy Land in the historian's time. Josephus (Antiquities 2.5-2.10) represents Cambyses as conquering the capital of Aethiopia, and changing its name from Seba to Meroe. Josephus affirms that the Queen of Sheba or Saba came from this region, and that it bore the name of Saba before it was known by that of Meroe. There seems also some affinity between the word Saba and the name or title of the kings of the Aethiopians, Sabaco.

The Talmud (Bava Batra 15b) insists that it was not a woman but a kingdom of Sheba (based on varying interpretations of Hebrew mlkt) that came to Jerusalem, obviously intended to discredit existing stories about the relations between Solomon and the Queen. Baba Bathra 15b: "Whoever says malkath Sheba (I Kings X, 1) means a woman is mistaken; ... it means the kingdom of Sheba".


Another image of "The Queen of Sheba."  Although she is first mentioned in the Bible as being from Ethiopia, many historians have attempted to catagorize her as non-African, and some have gone so far as to assert that she and her kingdom were from Yemen. This is yet another example of others attempting to downgrade Africa's dominate influence in world history.

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